Decline push-ups

Image of how to do decline push-ups

Introduction

Type: Strength

Main Muscle Worked: Chest

Equipment: Body Only or a weight vest

Level: Beginner

Also known as press ups.

What are Decline push-ups?

Decline push-ups are actually one of the simplest yet most beneficial exercises you can perform to gain strength and muscle in all of the right places, they require zero equipment as decline push-ups use your own body weight as resistance, working your upper body core at the same time.

The great thing about decline pushups is that it will be hard for you and your body to get used to them even though the standard variety of this move is easy to execute, however proper form is key and when done correctly will be very beneficial.

Muscles Worked in Decline Push-ups

Decline push-ups

  • • Pectorals (chest muscles)
  • • Deltoids (shoulders)
  • • Triceps (back of your arms)
  • • Abdominals (abs)
  • • Serratus anterior (the “wing” muscles directly under your armpit)

Benefits of Decline Push-ups

Burning calories

Doing decline push-ups can be a very powerful full-body workout, they use up a large amount of energy in a short period of time because the movements require large muscle groups to lift and hold much of the body’s weight so the more decline pushups a person does, the more calories they burn.

Improving cardiovascular health

Doing decline push-ups uses large muscle groups to lift and lower much of the body’s weight which increases the heart rate. Raising the heart rate during exercise helps strengthen the heart muscle, enabling it to pump more oxygenated blood to the lungs and throughout the body.

Tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which supply blood from arteries to tissues and organs, also widen to allow for better blood flow.

Doing exercises that raises the heart rate can help:

  • • lower blood pressure
  • • regulate blood sugar and insulin levels
  • • reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer
  • • lower body weight or maintain a healthy weight, alongside a calorie-controlled diet

Protecting the shoulder joint

When people use the correct technique, push-ups can help build up strength in the muscles around the shoulder joint. The muscles and tendons in the shoulder hold the upper arm bone in the socket.

When the muscles are weak, stress or injury to the shoulder can result in damage to the muscles and tendons.

Easy to do

Decline push-ups are a simple and easy exercise that requires very little or even no equipment to do, so a person can easily do them as part of an at-home workout. There are also many push-ups variations to suit people of different strengths and abilities.

How to do Decline Push-ups

Decline push-ups

 

  1. 1. Kneel on floor with the elevated surface behind the body and position your hands on the floor slightly wider than shoulder width.
  2. 2. Place your feet on a bench or another elevated surface and raise the body into a plank position with your body straight and arms extended.
  3. 3. While keeping your body straight, lower your upper body to the floor by bending the arms.
  4. 4. To allow for a full descent, pull your head back slightly without arching your back.
  5. 5. Then push your body up until the arms are fully extended.

Repeat for desired reps.

Mistakes commonly made in Decline push-ups

Hands Too Far Forward

If your hands are further out from your body than your shoulders are them you are placing more strain on your shoulders than you should. While you can vary how close your hands are together to get different effects and muscles worked, they should still be under your shoulders.

Locking out Elbows

A mistake you might when performing decline push-ups is locking your elbows at the top of the movement make you fatigue and want some rest. But this actually places too much stress and pressure on the joints and can lead to injury or strain. You should always keep a slight bend in the elbows and if you are fatigued then it’s time to take a rest before doing another set.

Safety when performing push-ups

You should not perform decline pushups if you have a shoulder, wrist, or elbow injury. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist to see if this is a suitable exercise for you. If you want to protect your wrists, you can place your hands on dumbbells or pushup bars to keep them in a neutral position. If you feel shoulder pain during the decline pushup then you should end the exercise.

Variations of Push-ups

If you are new at this exercise and do not have the strength to perform it, you can either bend your legs at the knees to take off resistance or perform the exercise against the wall instead of the floor.

Or to add resistance you can wear a weight vest, if you don’t have a weight vest one can be purchased here: Weight vest

Incline push-ups

Incline push-ups

  1. 1. Kneel on floor with the elevated surface in front of the body and position your hands on the elevated surface slightly wider than shoulder width.
  2. 2. Place your feet on the floor and raise the body into a plank position with your body straight and arms extended.
  3. 3. While keeping your body straight, lower your upper body to the elevated surface by bending the arms.
  4. 4. To allow for a full descent, pull your head back slightly without arching your back.
  5. 5. Then push your body up until the arms are fully extended.

Repeat for desired reps.

Standard Push-ups

Standard push-ups

  1. 1. Lie on the floor face down and place your hands about 36 inches apart while holding your torso up at arms length.
  2. 2. Next, lower yourself downward until your chest almost touches the floor as you inhale.
  3. 3. Now breathe out and press your upper body back up to the starting position while squeezing your chest.
  4. 4. After a brief pause at the top contracted position, you can begin to lower yourself downward again.

Repeat for desired reps.

Write below in the comments your opinion on the decline push-up, if it works for you and any questions you might have.

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